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Martial styles created by the Samurai. Today they are called Kobudo

Feudal Japan

Samurais emerged as a class of warriors in feudal Japan and ruled the country for nearly eight centuries. Being a Samurai was a social prestige as the occupying warrior class, the highest positions within the Japanese military dictatorship, called the Shogunate or Bakufu. Honor, justice, perfection, and loyalty, these are some of the words associated with the Samurai, the warrior class of feudal Japan and even today their influence is felt in the way of living and thinking of the Japanese people. Initially, the role of the Samurai was to collect taxes and serve the Empire. Since the 10th century, the figure of the Samurai takes form and increases from a series of military functions, reaching its peak in the 17th century. Martial styles created by the Samurai. Today they are called Kobudo. It was through the practice of these styles that the samurai succeeded in perfecting his techniques, strengthening his spirit, and aimed at improving him, with self-discipline and self-control. But what made this warrior unique was his famous code of honor and conduct, the Bushido. In addition to the philosophy assimilated by the samurai, the Bushido brought precepts for correct conduct before all situations.

Samurai (Kanji) literally means “one who serves” inheritance from when they were directly subordinate to the emperor.

Samurai (Kanji) literally means “one who serves” inheritance from when they were directly subordinate to the emperor. Another term frequently used to refer to samurai is Bushi, which literally means “Warrior”. It is the root of the Bushido word ” Warrior’s Way “. Modern Samurai are people who, today, apply Bushido and practice the art of the sword. In 1868, with the Meiji Restoration, the samurai class was abolished, and a Western-style national army was established. Even with these reforms, the Samurai would not let tradition die. Art with the sword created in the feudal times were cultivated and passed down from generation to generation until today. And Bushido survived in its purest form within the dojos in Kobudo. Today the arts of the ancient samurai are practiced with the aim of helping people overcome obstacles in their day-to-day lives and achieve peace of mind, control, discipline, and self-confidence. Modern Samurais are thus people who apply the philosophy of Bushido and the practice of the arts of the sword today, keeping alive a tradition of 800 years.